SELLINGOUTSTUDENTS.ORG A CAMPAIGN BY Higher Ed Not Debt
     

STUDENTS DECEIVED BY COLLEGES DESERVE A FULL REFUND

When Wall Street investors own your college, their profit is more important than your success. They use your student aid dollars on call centers, TV ads, Washington lobbyists, extravagant CEO salaries, and Wall Street profits.

For-profit colleges like ITT Tech, DeVry, the Art Institute, and University of Phoenix aggressively pressure students to enroll in order to make huge profits on overpriced programs. They lie to students about school quality, tuition, and job prospects. These schools cheat students out of their Pell Grants and GI Bill dollars, and leave them in crushing debt—all for an education that wasn't what they were promised.

Tell the Department of Education to hold for-profit colleges accountable and to stop selling out students!

SIGN THE PETITION

See how your college is selling out students.

Devry   Education Management Corporation   ITT   University of Phoenix

"The corporations that own these colleges often seem to care more about dollar signs than diplomas."
Director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Richard Cordray

   

NEWS AND RESOURCES

ARE YOU A VETERAN?

Tell the Department of Veteran Affairs about your experience.

Find veteran-specific resources.

See if you’re eligible for a refund grant from the Veterans Student Loan Relief Fund.

MORE NEWS ON THE EVILS OF FOR-PROFIT COLLEGES:

U.S. News and World Report: 3 Must-Know Facts About For-Profit Colleges, Student Debt

L.A. Times: U.S. Targets For-Profit Colleges That Saddle Students With High Debt

CNN Money: My College Degree Is Worthless

AdWeek: Come Super Bowl Sunday, Will the University of Phoenix Regret Its Naming Rights Deal?

 

*Education Management Corporation (EDMC) is one of the largest for-profit companies in the sector, operating under five brand names – Argosy, Brown Mackie, South University, Art Institutes, and Western State University College of Law.

 

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